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“Of life’s two chief prizes, beauty and truth, I found the first in a loving heart and the second in a laborer’s hand.

-Kahlil Gibran

Today is the 133rd birthday of Kahlil Gibran, internationally renowned poet and penetrating investigator of the human interior.

Gibran’s impact is amazing given the barriers he confronted in his growing years. He was the son of a single mother, raised in poverty, with little formal education.

A post from Cornell University’s library says this:

Being laden with poverty, he did not receive any formal education or learning, which was limited to regular visits to a village priest who doctrined him with the essentials of religion and the Bible, alongside Syriac and Arabic languages. Recognizing Gibran’s inquisitive and alert nature, the priest began teaching him the rudiments of alphabet and language, opening up to Gibran the world of history, science, and language. At the age of ten, Gibran fell off a cliff, wounding his left shoulder, which remained weak for the rest of his life ever since this incident. To relocate the shoulder, his family strapped it to a cross and wrapped it up for forty days, a symbolic incident reminiscent of Christ’s wanderings in the wilderness and which remained etched in Gibran’s memory.

Maria Popova at Brain Pickings has an elegant and beautiful post about him that you should read.

Given our focus at Citizen Ed, it seems appropriate to highlight one of his famous poems about kids.

 

On Children

Your children are not your children.
They are the sons and daughters of Life’s longing for itself.
They come through you but not from you,
And though they are with you yet they belong not to you.

You may give them your love but not your thoughts,
For they have their own thoughts.
You may house their bodies but not their souls,
For their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow,
which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
You may strive to be like them,
but seek not to make them like you.
For life goes not backward nor tarries with yesterday.

You are the bows from which your children
as living arrows are sent forth.
The archer sees the mark upon the path of the infinite,
and He bends you with His might
that His arrows may go swift and far.
Let your bending in the archer’s hand be for gladness;
For even as He loves the arrow that flies,
so He loves also the bow that is stable.

Citizen Stewart

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